the future of food by Philips Design

October 20th, 2009

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Looking at how we currently source and eat our food with today’s social trends, Philips Design conceptualized the possibility that could exist in 15-20 years. The first of 3 concepts shown above is the “Nutrition Monitor” which helps visualize the amount of food each person in the household eats and the nutritional needs of the individual. It tells the user the amount to eat based on the their health and body requirements.

These beautifully simplified concepts from Philips Design address our societal issues of obesity, the food we choose to eat, and sourcing food locally. Next 2 concepts after the jump.

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2 collections of Dried Fruit Jewelry

October 7th, 2009

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Love that artists explore with just about any medium and material.  Gorgeous, edible art! Reminds me a bit of RingPops.

Using only a silver ring and a dehydrator, a jewelery designer transforms fruit into wearable art. These rings are made with a simple silver ring that is then topped with slice and segments of various dried fruits. The results are completely edible and play with the notion of jewelery as a precious art. Each ring will slowly decompose and eventually disappear if it isn’t eaten first. The rings are made from fruits such as oranges, plums, kiwis, apples and beets.

More ‘dried fruit rings’ at DesignBoom

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just for fun: Swings

October 7th, 2009

Who doesn’t like swings? They were always my favorite at the playground!

This project is a study into different ways of bringing play back into public space. It focuses on ways of incorporating incidental play in the public realm by not so much as having separate play equipment that dictates the users but by using existing furniture and architectural elements that indicate playful behaviour for all.

via DesignVerb Read the rest of this entry »

the Pho experience

September 15th, 2009

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A lovely connection between tradition, culture, and dining is the Pho tableware set designed by Omid Sadri for the making and serving of Pho. Simply beautiful and functional.

“Phở (fuh) n.Traditional Vietnamese beef noodle soup. Enjoy it for breakfast, lunch or dinner.”

Inspired by the form of a classical Vietnamese lantern, the bowl set here is designed to “simplify and enrich” the experience of the famous Vietnamese dish. The bowl set makes the entire Pho dish easy to carry, then creates a unique experience by revealing the dish layer by layer.

via Yanko Design

Travel Therapy Book

September 15th, 2009

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Travel Therapy is a book of “Top Trips Based on What You’re Going Through in Life!”
Sounds like just what I need right about now.. 😛

via SwissMiss

The Senses: links (videos) on Food-Related-Design

September 6th, 2009


‘The best restaurant in the World,’ ElBulli is a 3 star Michelin in the little town of Cala Monjoi outside of Barcelona. And it looks amazing! Much more than visual eye candy, the gastronomical works of art must be a delight to experience. See the rest of Adam Roberts’ detailed account of his 30 course meal at ElBulli (with more videos and images) of his experience over at Amateur Gourmet and his El Bulli Recap (thanks to Allen the links!)
Wallpaper has a review and selection of pages from the book “ElBulli: Food for Thought, Thought for Food”. Read the rest of this entry »

Drink: a unique addition to the Boston bar scene

August 26th, 2009

Summer is coming to an end and Labor Day weekend is just around the corner. 2009 is flying by! I’ve been meaning to write this entry months ago. There’s no real excuse, except for a fun-filled summer and as a result entries have been scarce. Apologies to any readers out there!

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So here goes:
Almost a year ago, a friend took me to Drink at 348 Congress Street in the FortPoint area of South Boston. At the time, little did I know this cozy place was a new food and drink concept started by local chef Barbara Lynch alongside her bar maestro John Gertsen, which opened in September 2008.

Super fresh ingredients and knowledgeable bar staff are just the beginning. It’s truly about the experience and enjoyment of mingling. The odd zig-zag shaped bar allows for intimate conversation as sounds bounce around. Dark colors, metal decor and cool grays reflect the neighborhood’s transitioning industrial zone. Lighting is dim but welcoming; vibrant colors from fresh fruit will make you focus behind the bar. Scarce decor puts your attention to the basic ingredients and tools for a great cocktail.

Be patient since mixologists take longer than normal to stir-up a sensory experience. Bartenders go back and forth from the prep table to pick fresh herbs or peel fresh fruit and back to the bar to press olives for their juices for your beverage. The non-existent drink menu tests their skills as you describe the flavors you enjoy or ask for a suggestion. Well worth the wait for a strong, but not overpowering drink (I can’t recall what it was, but I’ll tell you whatever I had was delicious!)  The decor is well thought out and the choice of tableware is delightful. Bravo! Go check it out 🙂

Read more about Barbara Lynch’s Drink at Boston.com and FortPointBlog.

Fresh ingredients are more than just a trend. Pursip offers consultancy services and shares drink recipes using fresh ingredients that seem to revolve around interaction.

Michael Graves + [yellowtail]

August 6th, 2009

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Check out the interview with Michael Graves from DesignVerb. Some good insight into the similarities (and differences) between architecture and product/industrial design! Quite interesting. When I was in highschool I wanted to become an architect… and now, I often find myself comparing the two disciplines of architecture and industrial design. According to Mr. Graves, it’s all problem solving and human or environmental interaction, just on different scales.

DV:
What elements and methods in your architectural profession bring value to the product/industrial design discipline?

MG:
I don’t really view them as separate, actually. I’ve always fashioned myself a general practitioner, not as a specialist in any one area. I feel that too often, people become too specialized. Just as a lawyer should be well practiced in case law, an architect should have the same fundamental knowledge of their craft. And if your business evolves into an area of specialty, then that’s great – but it shouldn’t define the extent of your expertise.

DV:
What differences do you find between an architect and a product designer? Strengths, weaknesses.

MG:
Certainly, there’s a difference between the scale and complexity of a building and an artifact. However, we take the design of both equally seriously, and take into consideration their functionality, how people relate to and use them, how they each influence the continuum from the scale of a city to the building to the interior room to the object on the table. When looked at broadly rather than in isolation, buildings and products reflect our core values. If people intuitively understand how to use them and gain joy from their visual appearance, we’ve made a difference.

More insight about the design intent and process of [yellow tail] wine glasses on YouTube.

Read another interview on Architechnophilia

Food Styling and CGI

July 27th, 2009

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I was recently doing some personal research on food photography and styling and had no idea that Boston University hosted a Conference on Food Styling and Photography back in June. So sad to have missed out! Coincidentally, the other day I also came across a post on PSFK.

Images above show the post and mid-process of Computer Generated Imagery. Watch the Vimeo video of this transition from wireframe to enticing fries and burger done for Bernstein Rein Advertising.

As you will see, this is an entirely CGI spot. We used photo modeling techniques adding dimension to real studio photographs of a Big Mac and the the fries. The fry box, Dr. Pepper, ice, bubbles, smoke, straw, environment, etc are all entirely CGI.

The real reason to do this spot as CGI was to be able to choreograph the camera move in limited time and budget.

Wow, technology and amazing computer graphics with realistic rendering. Will this put food stylists and photographers out of work? Although, the graphics are based off studio photographs. Hm…the photo industry is certainly changing due to digital, any thoughts on technology changing the food styling industry?

via PSFK

Ben & Jerry’s Flipped Out!

July 12th, 2009

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A few weeks ago I was in Harvard Square for MakeMusicCambrdige. There were quite a few freebies and product samples for the event. Of note is Ben & Jerry’s new FlippedOut! ice-cream sundae.

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Bakus Table Mat: clever semi-DIY

July 5th, 2009

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A simple, elegantly designed stainless steel tray to be filled with your own, used wine corks. Then, replace the corks as necessary when they’re worn out. Such a lovely way of reusing… and extending the experience and memory from which the wine was enjoyed!

Learn more about the Bakus Tray by Ciclus via Wired

Patent: Airline Seat Configurations go Vertical

June 16th, 2009

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Emil Jacob of Cambridge, MA patented this idea for airline seating in 2006.

“step seat principle” It involves elevating alternate rows of seats, from one to five steps above the cabin floor, to give passengers more room to lean back in economy class and enough space in business class to lie down, either by sliding their legs under the seat in front of them or stretching out in pods stacked on top of each other – no sweater on the floor required.

The simplest version raises every other row of economy seats by 7 inches, a standard step height, allowing passengers to recline seats at up to a 45-degree angle (a few inches more than the 3 to 5 inches that’s standard in economy, Daimler said) and elevate their legs on a foldable footrest that takes advantage of the space underneath the seat in front of them. It’s a more “sleepable position,” Jacob said.

The staggered vertical seating allows for more individual passenger comfort and room, but also increasing carrier capacity, all while using the same amount of space that currently exists in airplanes. Jacob is currently discussing with a few airlines… I wonder if it will come to fruition.

via Boston.com

[Update: check out some computer render concepts on Core77 here, here and here]