Archive for the ‘history’ Category

Wine Labels: rebirth of authentic Chinese design?

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

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I must admit (and ashamed that), I’m not well-versed in Chinese (or Asian) art/design history, but this short article from PSFK, got me connecting some dots. It looks like China’s on the verge of a new design revolution (of course, among other things), where the Chinese embrace their cultural heritage and contemporize it.

Not too long ago, Chinese wine connoisseurs had a diverse range of wine selections with amazingly intricate and detailed design packaging. But after foreign imported wines began entering the Chinese market, many of these wine brands died off, along with their special wine design aesthetic.

Just look at the ingredients of these wines, there’s grape, rice, sorghum, millet, and even more rarely seen these days are Chinese gooseberry, sweet-smelling osmanthus, cherry, longan, apple and tangerine flavors.

The thought of these unique labels and ingredients remind me of an LA Soda Pop Shop, who carries over 500 varieties of naturally sweet and flavored sodas, free of high-fructose corn syrup.

As creativity and confidence creeps back into the minds of Chinese designers, it’s possible that a distinct Chinese wine label aesthetic will once again bloom and quench the thirsts of those who remember when wine had flavor and beauty.

Ditto.

via PSFK

Chinese New Year 2009 in HK

Friday, March 6th, 2009

It’s been almost a month since I came back from Asia and celebrating Chinese New Year (Jan 26) in Hong Kong. Here’s the CNY celebration recap: People, people, people everywhere! (1,330,044,544 people in China from July 2008 estimate)

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New Year’s Fair in Victoria Park, Hong Kong is filled with people!! We could barely see or stop to look at all the souvenirs for sale on the side of the aisles. Vendors are screaming for attention at the sidelines and have the wackiest signs as high as possible with balloons and the like so that you have a glimpse of what they’re selling.. buy it only if you can go through the crowd to get there in the first place. Fun vibe!

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Victor Schreckengost: unspoken legend

Monday, January 19th, 2009

This post is long overdue…

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Back in May of last year, I visited an exhibit which showcased the work of Victor Schreckngost, who passed away at the age of 101 in 2008.  Along with his own work was the work of his students and some of his students’ students at the Attleboro Arts Musuem in Attleboro, MA. Schreckengost completed or produced at least one piece of design or art work each week of his career! That is amazing. See more photos of the IDSAboston trip from IDSAboston’s Flickr.
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Treasures of Syracuse University library

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

Tonight I went to Boston Public Library to listen to Suzanne Thorin, University Librarian and Dean of Libraries of Syracuse University (my alma mater!), speak about SU’s treasured artifacts and special collections. And what an incredible collection it is! Of course, as always, I wish I knew about it sooner- when I was a student less than 2 years ago. Although there were only a handful of items presented, all had an impact that I wish I had known about- particularly during freshman art history class. I had no idea that SU had nearly 80% of Marcel Breuer’s original architectural design sketches or Margaret Burke-White’s original camera equipment and photography prints and negatives. It truly brings history to life to be able to see first hand the thought process of writers and artists or to appreciate artwork close up!

I was able to snap a few photographs of some artifacts:

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It’s not just the sound of “Thomas Edison’s Blue Amber Record,” but the packaging that is significant. Package on right LEFT uses less material and 1 less color- saves on cost, production, and materials! A genius Edison was.

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“Illuminated Manuscript,” significant in its use of vellum paper and Gutenberg’s Printing Press over woodblock typography setting. Gorgeous.

The Special Collection (6th floor, Bird Library) is constantly in search of ways to better itself for the use of Syracuse University’s faculty and students. I can’t wait to hear more about the Plastics Collection of the 1940’s-50’s that came from Leominster, MA! This will certainly be a great resource for ID students in Smith Hall 🙂

Thanks for the educational evening! Learn more about Syracuse University’s Library here.